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INTERNATIONAL CONCERT STAR OF THE HARMONICA AND IRISH HUMORIST
 
   LARRY LOGAN, is properly listed among the elite few who have elevated the harmonica to the concert stage. From a hobby which began during his childhood, Logan developed his talent to the point that his performances on the little known instrument (at least in serious music) led to a career of recitals and as soloist with symphony orchestras throughout the world. He has also worked with a stunning array of legendary names in show business. They include Bob Hope, Rudy Vallee, Eddie Cantor, Jimmy Durante, Gizele MacKenzie, Lisa Kirk, Cab Calloway, Mickey Rooney, and a host of others.
 
  His greatest accomplishment, however, has been in overcoming the doubts about the harmonica as a solo instrument in classical concerts. To that end, he has appeared in thousands of concerts performing to millions worldwide. Chronologically, Logan became the third person in the world to appear as soloist with major symphony orchestras playing the harmonica. They include the orchestras of St. Louis, Washington D. C., Birmingham, Manila, Singapore, Shreveport, San Juan, Nashville, Kingsport, New Orleans, and San Antonio.
 
   Another notable credit was his selection by the Department of State to represent the United States on the President's International Cultural Exchange Program. As America's musical envoy, Logan toured the Far East and was heard by a greater audience than had ever before attended recitals and concerts of one playing the harmonica.
 
   Recently added to the many acheivements of his distinguished career, Logan has been included in the 1990 edition of WHO'S WHO IN MUSIC by the international biographical institute of Cambridge, England.

   The moment he walked on stage, Logan relaxed his audience with an Irish wit, then gracefully transformed the mood into a virtuoso performance.

   The showman whose virtuosity on the harmonica took him around the world, Larry Logan died in his native Lafayette, Louisiana
on Wednesday, November 10, 2004.
He was 77.